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November 27, 2017

Sharing My Story
12:00pm - 1:00 pm

Schwitzer Student Center, Trustees Dining Room

Students, Faculty & staff will share their stories of their spring term service trip to Ghana, West Africa. Bring your lunch. Coffee and cookies available.


November 27, 2017

Protestant Holy Communion
9:00pm - 9:30 pm

Schwitzer Student Center, McCleary Chapel



November 28, 2017

Interfaith Winter Festival
7:00pm - 8:30 pm

Schwitzer Student Center, UHA

We are celebrating the many faith/spiritual traditions that occur during the wintertime! Student and community groups will bring a dish that represents their tradition, and Rabbi Scott Fox will speak.


November 29, 2017

Quran Study
5:00pm - 6:00 pm

Schwitzer Student Center, McCleary Chapel

Weekly english readings of the Quran and peer-led discussions on Islam as well as other various topics. Anyone's welcome!


November 30, 2017

Christian Worship
9:00pm - 10:00 pm

Schwitzer Student Center, McCleary Chapel

Ecumenical worship service.


December 03, 2017

The Peak, Men's Spiritual Peer Mentoring and Salt N Light, women's spiritual peer mentoring Christma
9:00pm - 10:00 pm

Schwitzer Student Center, Trustee Dining Room



December 04, 2017

Labyrinth, walking prayer
9:00am - 11:00 pm

Schwitzer Student Center, McCleary Chapel

Labyrinth in chapel from 9 am Monday through 3 pm Thursday.

Walking Prayer

Labyrinth

What is a labyrinth?
The labyrinth is a model or metaphor for life. The Christian life is often described as a pilgrimage of the faithful who are “in but not of the world.” We progress down a path that’s laid out by God, even though we rarely foresee its twists and turns, toward the eventual goal of union with Christ. (Jones, Tony. Soul Shaper, p. 147).

The labyrinth is a walking prayer. The labyrinth itself is just a tool, a guide that helps us as we pray. When we walk the labyrinth, we pray with our mind, heart and body. We reflect on what we need to let go of in our lives so that we might truly follow Jesus. The act of walking while we pray can help us slow down and focus. Our mind can become so active that it is hard to concentrate. As we walk slowly, it allows our mind to slow down so that we can talk with God with fewer distractions.

How to pray using the labyrinth:
The labyrinth has only one path which leads to its center and out again. The twists and turns of the path are reflections of our own spiritual journey. We know that our relationship with God has some surprising turns on the way.

Beginning to walk the labyrinth
Before you begin walking the labyrinth, pause and take time to breathe deeply. Begin your walk with an open heart. Think about your life. What are you struggling with? Are you afraid of beginning this new phase of your life? Take whatever is in your heart to Jesus. As you walk to the center of the labyrinth, talk to Jesus about whatever is in your heart and mind these days.

How you choose to walk the labyrinth is up to you. Try to walk it slowly enough that you are able to reflect on your life. Pay attention to each step and be aware of your whole self praying to God. You might want to take time to stop along the way. Others might be walking the labyrinth with you – be aware of how you share your space with them. Are you comfortable letting them pass you or having to pass them? Does it mirror your encounters with others in our daily life?

When you reach the center
When you reach the center of the labyrinth, take time to rest as long as you like. You can stand, sit or kneel – whatever is comfortable for you. Take time to rest with Jesus.

Walking back
As you walk from the center of the labyrinth, ask Jesus for the grace you need to walk each day with him. Jesus knows you better than you know yourself. Allow God’s peace to fill you as you continue the pilgrimage of your daily life.

Reflecting on the experience of walking the labyrinth
When you finish walking the labyrinth, take time to reflect on the experience. You might want to do this at a later time when you are by yourself. You might want to take time to journal about the experience or talk to another about it.


December 05, 2017

Labyrinth, walking prayer
9:00am - 11:00 pm

Schwitzer Student Center, McCleary Chapel

Labyrinth in chapel from 9 am Monday through 3 pm Thursday.

Walking Prayer

Labyrinth

What is a labyrinth?
The labyrinth is a model or metaphor for life. The Christian life is often described as a pilgrimage of the faithful who are “in but not of the world.” We progress down a path that’s laid out by God, even though we rarely foresee its twists and turns, toward the eventual goal of union with Christ. (Jones, Tony. Soul Shaper, p. 147).

The labyrinth is a walking prayer. The labyrinth itself is just a tool, a guide that helps us as we pray. When we walk the labyrinth, we pray with our mind, heart and body. We reflect on what we need to let go of in our lives so that we might truly follow Jesus. The act of walking while we pray can help us slow down and focus. Our mind can become so active that it is hard to concentrate. As we walk slowly, it allows our mind to slow down so that we can talk with God with fewer distractions.

How to pray using the labyrinth:
The labyrinth has only one path which leads to its center and out again. The twists and turns of the path are reflections of our own spiritual journey. We know that our relationship with God has some surprising turns on the way.

Beginning to walk the labyrinth
Before you begin walking the labyrinth, pause and take time to breathe deeply. Begin your walk with an open heart. Think about your life. What are you struggling with? Are you afraid of beginning this new phase of your life? Take whatever is in your heart to Jesus. As you walk to the center of the labyrinth, talk to Jesus about whatever is in your heart and mind these days.

How you choose to walk the labyrinth is up to you. Try to walk it slowly enough that you are able to reflect on your life. Pay attention to each step and be aware of your whole self praying to God. You might want to take time to stop along the way. Others might be walking the labyrinth with you – be aware of how you share your space with them. Are you comfortable letting them pass you or having to pass them? Does it mirror your encounters with others in our daily life?

When you reach the center
When you reach the center of the labyrinth, take time to rest as long as you like. You can stand, sit or kneel – whatever is comfortable for you. Take time to rest with Jesus.

Walking back
As you walk from the center of the labyrinth, ask Jesus for the grace you need to walk each day with him. Jesus knows you better than you know yourself. Allow God’s peace to fill you as you continue the pilgrimage of your daily life.

Reflecting on the experience of walking the labyrinth
When you finish walking the labyrinth, take time to reflect on the experience. You might want to do this at a later time when you are by yourself. You might want to take time to journal about the experience or talk to another about it.


December 06, 2017

Labyrinth, walking prayer
9:00am - 11:00 pm

Schwitzer Student Center, McCleary Chapel

Labyrinth in chapel from 9 am Monday through 3 pm Thursday.

Walking Prayer

Labyrinth

What is a labyrinth?
The labyrinth is a model or metaphor for life. The Christian life is often described as a pilgrimage of the faithful who are “in but not of the world.” We progress down a path that’s laid out by God, even though we rarely foresee its twists and turns, toward the eventual goal of union with Christ. (Jones, Tony. Soul Shaper, p. 147).

The labyrinth is a walking prayer. The labyrinth itself is just a tool, a guide that helps us as we pray. When we walk the labyrinth, we pray with our mind, heart and body. We reflect on what we need to let go of in our lives so that we might truly follow Jesus. The act of walking while we pray can help us slow down and focus. Our mind can become so active that it is hard to concentrate. As we walk slowly, it allows our mind to slow down so that we can talk with God with fewer distractions.

How to pray using the labyrinth:
The labyrinth has only one path which leads to its center and out again. The twists and turns of the path are reflections of our own spiritual journey. We know that our relationship with God has some surprising turns on the way.

Beginning to walk the labyrinth
Before you begin walking the labyrinth, pause and take time to breathe deeply. Begin your walk with an open heart. Think about your life. What are you struggling with? Are you afraid of beginning this new phase of your life? Take whatever is in your heart to Jesus. As you walk to the center of the labyrinth, talk to Jesus about whatever is in your heart and mind these days.

How you choose to walk the labyrinth is up to you. Try to walk it slowly enough that you are able to reflect on your life. Pay attention to each step and be aware of your whole self praying to God. You might want to take time to stop along the way. Others might be walking the labyrinth with you – be aware of how you share your space with them. Are you comfortable letting them pass you or having to pass them? Does it mirror your encounters with others in our daily life?

When you reach the center
When you reach the center of the labyrinth, take time to rest as long as you like. You can stand, sit or kneel – whatever is comfortable for you. Take time to rest with Jesus.

Walking back
As you walk from the center of the labyrinth, ask Jesus for the grace you need to walk each day with him. Jesus knows you better than you know yourself. Allow God’s peace to fill you as you continue the pilgrimage of your daily life.

Reflecting on the experience of walking the labyrinth
When you finish walking the labyrinth, take time to reflect on the experience. You might want to do this at a later time when you are by yourself. You might want to take time to journal about the experience or talk to another about it.


December 06, 2017

Quran Study
5:00pm - 6:00 pm

Schwitzer Student Center, McCleary Chapel

Weekly english readings of the Quran and peer-led discussions on Islam as well as other various topics. Anyone's welcome!


December 06, 2017

Taize Christian Worship Service
7:00pm - 7:45 pm

off campus: University Heights United Methodist Church

“It is a time to rest in God, to let the words listened to and sung penetrate one’s being.” Brother John

More information about Taize can be found here https://www.taize.fr/en

For more information about Taize at UHUMC please contact UIndy's Chapel Steward of Devotion, Christianna Lopez at lopezca@uindy.edu


December 07, 2017

Labyrinth, walking prayer
9:00am - 11:00 pm

Schwitzer Student Center, McCleary Chapel

Labyrinth in chapel from 9 am Monday through 3 pm Thursday.

Walking Prayer

Labyrinth

What is a labyrinth?
The labyrinth is a model or metaphor for life. The Christian life is often described as a pilgrimage of the faithful who are “in but not of the world.” We progress down a path that’s laid out by God, even though we rarely foresee its twists and turns, toward the eventual goal of union with Christ. (Jones, Tony. Soul Shaper, p. 147).

The labyrinth is a walking prayer. The labyrinth itself is just a tool, a guide that helps us as we pray. When we walk the labyrinth, we pray with our mind, heart and body. We reflect on what we need to let go of in our lives so that we might truly follow Jesus. The act of walking while we pray can help us slow down and focus. Our mind can become so active that it is hard to concentrate. As we walk slowly, it allows our mind to slow down so that we can talk with God with fewer distractions.

How to pray using the labyrinth:
The labyrinth has only one path which leads to its center and out again. The twists and turns of the path are reflections of our own spiritual journey. We know that our relationship with God has some surprising turns on the way.

Beginning to walk the labyrinth
Before you begin walking the labyrinth, pause and take time to breathe deeply. Begin your walk with an open heart. Think about your life. What are you struggling with? Are you afraid of beginning this new phase of your life? Take whatever is in your heart to Jesus. As you walk to the center of the labyrinth, talk to Jesus about whatever is in your heart and mind these days.

How you choose to walk the labyrinth is up to you. Try to walk it slowly enough that you are able to reflect on your life. Pay attention to each step and be aware of your whole self praying to God. You might want to take time to stop along the way. Others might be walking the labyrinth with you – be aware of how you share your space with them. Are you comfortable letting them pass you or having to pass them? Does it mirror your encounters with others in our daily life?

When you reach the center
When you reach the center of the labyrinth, take time to rest as long as you like. You can stand, sit or kneel – whatever is comfortable for you. Take time to rest with Jesus.

Walking back
As you walk from the center of the labyrinth, ask Jesus for the grace you need to walk each day with him. Jesus knows you better than you know yourself. Allow God’s peace to fill you as you continue the pilgrimage of your daily life.

Reflecting on the experience of walking the labyrinth
When you finish walking the labyrinth, take time to reflect on the experience. You might want to do this at a later time when you are by yourself. You might want to take time to journal about the experience or talk to another about it.


December 07, 2017

Christian Worship
9:00pm - 10:00 pm

Schwitzer Student Center, McCleary Chapel

Ecumenical worship service.


December 13, 2017

Quran Study
5:00pm - 6:00 pm

Schwitzer Student Center, McCleary Chapel

Weekly english readings of the Quran and peer-led discussions on Islam as well as other various topics. Anyone's welcome!